Electioneering on Election Day: What Can & Can’t Happen at the Polls

Electioneering, campaigning, and other efforts to influence voters in favor of a certain candidate, issue, or slate are a vital part of the political process, but such activities are restricted on Election Day at Neighborhood Council Elections.

Electioneering includes but is not limited to activities such as:

  • Soliciting a vote or otherwise speaking to voters regarding how they choose to mark their ballots
  • Placing or posting any sign, poster, sticker, or other material relating to a particular candidate, issue, or slate of candidates
  • Distributing or wearing campaign paraphernalia relating to any candidate, slate, or issue, including T-shirts, buttons, and stickers
  • Placing or posting a sign, distributing material, or conversing with voters on the subject of their qualifications to vote
  • Excessive noise and/or audio equipment that creates a nuisance to voters or poll workers
  • Placing a banner or placard on a vehicle that solicits a vote or recommends a given candidate, slate, or position on an issue

Electioneering such as the activities listed above is not allowed within 100 feet of a Polling Place on Election Day. The 100 feet is measured from the door of the Polling Place where voters enter to register and cast their ballots. Polling Place staff will place signs indicating where the 100 foot mark is located. Vehicles featuring campaign banners or placards as described above may only briefly come within 100 feet of the building where the polls are located in order to pick up or drop off passengers, and must otherwise maintain a 100 foot or more distance from that building.

Any electioneering activities being conducted beyond the 100 foot mark are still subject to the rules and regulations of the property where the Polling Place is located, and anyone campaigning outside a Polling Place must respect and follow these rules. Anyone engaged in electioneering or other campaigning efforts within 100 feet of a Polling Place will be told to cease their activities, and they may also be asked to leave.

For more information on electioneering and Neighborhood Council Elections, see the official Neighborhood Council Election Manual at http://empowerla.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/NC-Election-Manual.pdf

 

By | 2017-01-09T12:31:14+00:00 June 1st, 2016|Blog, Neighborhood Council Elections|Comments Off on Electioneering on Election Day: What Can & Can’t Happen at the Polls